Breastfeeding A to Z

Infant Weight

Information is listed by baby’s age

Three Weeks Old

If your weight check was within the normal limits at the 2 week mark, depending on your healthcare provider, you may not have another weight check until your baby is 6 weeks to 2 months old.

If you have any concerns about how well your baby is doing, a weight check is a quick way of check.  Without a scale, your best gauge that baby is gaining weight is the number of dirty diapers you are changing in 24 hours.  At least 3 dirty diapers in 24 hours tell you your baby is gaining weight and doing well.

Again, if you have any doubts, just have them weighted.  Usually, you can call your healthcare provider’s office and ask for just a weight check, without a regular visit.

 

Five-Six Weeks Old

Your baby may have already had another weight check, depending on your healthcare provider’s office practices or they may be going in at around 2 months of age.

If you are at all concerned about how your baby is doing, weighing them can be a good indication of how things are going with feeding.  Most healthcare providers will just weigh your baby without a regular office visit if you give them a call and ask.

Your baby will typically be gaining about 1/2-1 ounce (15-30 grams) per day. (1)  Remember it is helpful if your baby is weighed on the same scale in the same manner (nude or with diaper only) to be more accurate.  When you are measuring in ounces (grams) of change, it makes a difference.

  1. Mohrbacher, N, Stock, J, La Leche League  International The Breastfeeding Answer Book, 3rd revised edition, Schaumburg, IL, La Leche League International, 2003 p 148.

 

2 Months Old

Your baby will be weighed and measured at their healthcare provider visit.  Your baby should continue to gain roughly 1/2 – 1 ounce (15-30 grams) per day. (1)  Remember try to have your baby weighed in the same clothes or just a diaper or with nothing on.  Be consistent each time, so the weights are more accurate.  When you are dealing in baby weight, ounces make a difference.

  1. Lawrence, RA, Lawrence, RM, Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Professional, 7th edition, Maryland Heights, MO, Elsevier Mosby, 2011, p 276.

 

4 Months Old

Usually 4 months is another well check for your baby.  Often a totally breastfed baby will start to slow their growth.  This is normal.  They are usually being compared to a growth chart that was developed when the majority of baby’s were formula fed.  Check if your healthcare provider uses a growth chart that has been developed for breastfed babies.  It is common for you baby’s formula-fed counterparts to be heavier.  If they are continuing to gain roughly 1/2 to 1 ounce (15-30 grams) per day they are right on track. (1)

Sometimes solid foods are discussed at this healthcare provider visit.  Often when you have the next growth spurt between 5-6 months of age is when solid foods are introduced.  Make sure your baby shows the signs of readiness.  See Solid Food Introduction

  1. Mohrbacher, N, Stock, J, La Leche League International The Breastfeeding Answer Book, 3rd revised edition, Schaumburg, IL, La Leche League International, 2003, p 148.

 

6 Months Old

Six months is often another well check with your healthcare provider.  While the rate of growth of your breastfed baby often slows down around 4 months, they will still usually double their birth weight by 6 months.  Their rate of weight gain is now more like 4-5 ounces (120-150 grams) per week from 4-6 months of age and 2-4 ounces (60-120 grams) per week from 6-12 months of age.

  1. Mohrbacher, N, Stock, J, La Leche League International The Breastfeeding Answer Book, 3rd revised edition, Schaumburg, IL, La Leche League International, 2003, p 148.